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20131202
20131210
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is that doha and qatar through a number of careful and calculated foreign-policy mechanisms and through this careful use of the foreign policy toolbox, several tools in the toolbox has been able to create conditions whereby they can pursue their interests. and what are some of those tools >> first and foremost, foreign-policy it might be best as hedging and this comes from gambling and it's a term that comes from gambling whereby you place one major bad, let's say you bet on the united states to guarantee your security. and you place a number of smaller bets as well unless they you may then for traumatize with come ons or iran or other individuals they may not necessarily see eye to eye. and what they have been able to do through their carefully calculated policy regimen is to position itself as an important conduit between various actors that otherwise do not speak to one another. so for example, a couple of months ago, qatar was extremely successful, although aborted in many ways, successful and position of itself and that was really an interesting development. and qatar has been able
pockets. china and egypt at the same foreign policies toward the pressing issues and amenities. both have been working to push forward a two state solution for the palestinian israeli conflict base of the nineteen sixty seven borders and they support a political solution for this are in crisis the look. she had the time she will walk in with goals he resigns to peaceful solution. the results you email it to accomplish. no one will win. the serum people would suffer a loss both the opposition the government to cdm in geneva to implement the resolutions of june you will want oh emphasize on china's bizarre to expand the already increasing exports to egypt. but twelve economic ties are strengthening. some analysts believe the current buyback or religions are not satisfactory. would it didn't cost us three dollars due respect to china supports all you have all of the time that's variations does not see that the star of the ties between the two nations. we asked the owner looking forward to morning mass demands more terrorists egypt is now revising these foreign policy and upstream from the ti
and economic assistance. other tools of former -- foreign policy. the state department budget is puny in comparison to the defense budget. you get an awful lot of benefit from some of those investments that the state department, in terms of assistance, economic assistance and it is that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. moree senate, we have bipartisan support for that. lindsey graham, john mccain, they have been big supporters of a robust state department budget. house, some of our colleagues on the republican -- broadlyially defined as the tea party folks, it has been difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that form of assistance. this is a constant back-and- forth. if you look at the house republican budget over the ten- year period, it would cut the category of the budget for those kind of state department operations. we going to have to work together to try and prevent it. if you want to do the kinds of things that mike rogers wants to do and i agree with most
. >> interestingly, on the political front, we know of course that the eu foreign policy chief, katherine ashton is due to arrive on tuesday. what doo does this signify? >> authorities show their strength on monday. but it is ahead of the possibility at least of further negotiation. and coincidentally, we heard the president yanukovych who, of course, these protestors want out and new elections taking place, has offered the possibility of talks. the opposition initially have said, we're not prepared to talk. when we're hemmed in by your riot police. but i think with katherine ashton's arrival, there is a possibility, at least account, that the -- at least, that the warg factions in this dispute might move towards talking to each other. that will certainly be her aim. and it's also, i think, although one can never be sure about these things, that while she is here, perhaps the authorities will not move against the protestors who are still camped out here, as we were saying, and also occupying city hall. >> they are camped out in what are freezing conditions. it's been snowing there for most of th
of the agenda at their own national security foreign policy interest. if this is good for russia, they will be at the table. that is a double edged sword. it can be a great way to solve some problems across the middle east, but we need to be extremely cautious of setting the table but so any agreement or arrangement with the russians also protects u.s., our allies interests in the region as well. the assad -- if you look at the tenets of the chemical agreement, great we got some chemical weapons off, but the russians cleaned up on us on exactly what they got in that particular field. and because of that we alienated our allies in the region. that is an important component. i am for getting that deal, but we are paying a price for that deal, but not only including the allies in negotiating that deal. >> let's consider this conversation on syria. we you were a sponsor in the summer of the free syria act, a bill to provide arms and support to the syrian rebels. when we interviewed the representative, he said he was pleased to have your co- sponsorship of the bill, a bipartisan effor
to our foreign policy series discussion on the recently signed interim agreement between iran and the p5 plus germany and geneva. we have gathered a distinguished panel of experts who will walk us through what just happened and what may lie ahead. headlines during the last 48 hours have run the entire spectrum from victory for iran obamastoric mistake to achieves historic measure. most comments have followed what has become a redeemable republican/democrat divide, but recent polls indicate that nearly 2/3 of all americans support an agreement with iran at would lift sanctions for iran in return for tehran restricting its nuclear program. what is undeniable is that there are many layers to this cake, and we look forward to hearing from our panelists as they discuss whether the agreement brings new hope for nuclear negotiations with iran or further disappointment. our panelists are no strangers to the world affairs council audiences. we welcome back all three. ambassador john bloomberg is professor at the united -- professor of international affairs at the united states naval academy -- am
necessary for our folks. >> did you have a question? >> thank you. i am a fellow at the foreign policy institute here at sais. you mentioned one common interest the united states has with russia and syria is to prevent syria from becoming a base of operations for al qaeda. once we start changing the border regime in that part of the world, we are in for changes that will have many repercussions. my question is as follows -- do you foresee in the medium-term, scenario where we see assad staying in power as being instrumental in that we share with the russians. > i think the american position, which i support, has been that you had, in syria, at he beginning of the arab spring, a movement that represented the aspirations of the majority of the syrian people across the secretary and lines for more openness and hange. the assad regime is a brutal regime that suppresses the rights of the people. e need to change the regime in syria. the challenge has been -- from our perspective we think be syrian the people deserve a government, one that represents their aspirations. we need to make sure t
important tools of foreign-policy which as secretary gates and other secretaries of defense have made clear, the state department budget is unique in comparison with the defense budget but again an awful lot of benefit from some of those state department both in terms of assistance, economic assistance and other forms of assistance and it's that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. although i would say in the senate we have more, much more bipartisan support so for example senator lindsey graham and senator john mccain have been very big supporters of a robust state department budget as well. but in the house certainly some of our colleagues on the public inside a specially broadly defined as the tea party folks, i mean they have got, it's been really difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that assistance. but again this is a constant back-and-forth and if you look at the house republican budget over the ten-year period it dramatically dramatically, it would dramatically cut
of state schultz and others, former senate foreign relations chairman dick lugar were pushing very strongly for a different policy. >> they were. they knew the veto was a mistake. right after that secretary schultz moved to redescribe anc not as terrorist organization and open up contacts with the group in osaka. >> you were on the ground when he came out -- >> after he came out. >> moved into the negotiations which were critical. >> went up and down in 1992, had a break in the negotiations, a serious break over violence. the two presidents, the two leaders, nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk came together, one of the things they agreed, which is a lesson for other peace processes that thereafter to acts of violence would be allowed to interrupt the peace process. the spoilers would not be allowed to do that. it was important because there was a lot of violence after that. >> that was also true of the northern ireland peace process. that was a key point they could not veto an agreement forward, a lesson not learned by israeli-palestinians sadly. what do you think was the special quality in ne
-amnesty groups, at helping foreigners stay in the united states. now that they're at dhs, they can impose these ideas, these ideologies, these policies regardless of what congress does or does not do. >> we've got some of the details. you had written a column on this and you detailed each of them. michael salo in, and others. because everybody has got a very detailed biography, how would you summarize these people? >> they're all on the far left open border side of the equation. look at jennifer lee. when she was at a pro-open borders group, they actually published a pamphlet titled "what to do in the event of a raid." it was given to illegal aliens to help them if they were raided. look at morera wee. she wrote articles attacking dhs before she went to work for dhs because dhs, she was gathering fingerprint data from people they caught crossing the border so they couldn't keep doing it over and over again. she was against that. it's crazy stuff and now they're in the government enforcing immigration law. >> unlike a politician, politicians can get elected out of office. booted out by the
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10